Academic Departments

The purpose of the English program is to prepare students to further their personal and formal education. The program at La Salle begins with critical reading and discussion and leads to critical analysis and writing. A direct encounter with various genres of significant world literature develops reading and thinking abilities, along with an aesthetic appreciation of literature for the present and the future. The understanding of the structural principles of literature, drama, and poetry is considered crucial to the development of organized skills in composition. A directed emphasis on the writing of individual students serves as a means for learning and further enhances critical and analytical thinking across the curriculum. Discussion and student presentations improve listening skills and the ability to communicate ideas and information.


English Courses Offered

Introduction to Literature and Composition Honors (Freshman Required)

A more intensive version of 310, this honors-level course accelerates the study of writing, while examining literature in a more rigorous and comprehensive manner. Core works include: Of Mice and Men, Julius Caesar, The Old Man and the Sea, Things Fall Apart, and The Odyssey, among others.

1 Credit/full year

Intorduction to Literature and Composition (Freshman Required)

The purpose of the freshman English course is to enhance and broaden reading, discussion, composition, and vocabulary skills. Students begin their journey to learn critical thinking skills by reading and close textual analyses of appropriate short stories, novels, plays, poetry, and essays. The writing program emphasizes the process of writing, stressing mastery of the concise expository paragraph as the essential component of the complete essay. Vocabulary enrichment comes through the discovery of words in the context of the readings as well as through exercises in a standard vocabulary text. Core works include: Of Mice and Men, Julius Caesar, The Old Man and the Sea, and The Odyssey, among others.

1 Credit/full year

American Literature and Composition (Sophomore Required)

The sophomore English course consists of reading and discussing important works of American Literature, refinement of the writing skills developed in the freshman year, and continued development of the formal essay. The literature study focuses on selected major American writers, including study of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama from the colonial era to the modern period. Writing assignments continue to develop in a holistic approach from the planning stages through drafting and revising, to the final essay. Such writings emphasize more selectively the formal elements of thesis paragraph, developing paragraphs, precise word and phrase selection, use of supportive examples, and a convincing conclusion. Vocabulary study evolves contextually from the readings, along with a formal vocabulary series. Core works include: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, To Kill a Mockingbird/The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, and The Catcher in the Rye, among others.

1 Credit/full year

American Literature and Composition Honors (Sophomore Required)

A more intensive version of American Literature and Composition, this course accelerates the study of writing, while examining a larger volume of literature in a more rigorous and comprehensive manner. Core works include: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Scarlet Letter, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Great Gatsby, The Catcher in the Rye, Into the Wild, and Twelve Years a Slave, among others.

1 Credit/full year

Rhetoric and British Literature (Junior Required)

The junior year is broken up into two distinct semesters. The first will include a rigorous study of rhetorical devices and strategies and will emphasize the study of various forms of non-fiction: the formal essay, biography, editorials, and satire. A special emphasis will be placed on critical reading and argumentative essay writing. The second part of the junior curriculum will be a survey of the British literary tradition with an emphasis on using the rhetorical skills developed in the first semester. Additionally, the skills associated with research papers are learned throughout the year in a variety of smaller, specifically focused assignments, using the school’s academic computer network. Core works include: The Tipping Point, Superfreakonomics, Beowulf, Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, Frankenstein, and Gullivers Travels, among others.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition (Junior Elective)

This course combines the English 3 Rhetoric and British Literature course with Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, including preparation for the College Board Advanced Placement examination in English Language taken in late spring. First semester includes a rigorous study of rhetorical devices and strategies and emphasizes the study of various forms of non-fiction: the formal essay, biography, editorials, and satire. Special emphasis is placed on critical reading and essay writing, including rhetorical analysis, argumentative, and synthesis essays. The study of rhetoric and preparation for the Advanced Placement examination continues throughout the second semester and a survey of British Literature is added, including drama, novels, poetry, and essays by British writers. In addition, students write a research paper and work on college entrance essays. Core works include: The Tipping Point, Superfreakonomics, Beowulf, Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, Frankenstein, and Gulliver’s Travels, among others.
Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.
Prerequisite: Permission of Sophomore English teacher, AP English Language and Composition teacher and English Department.

1 Credit/full year

World Literature and Expository Writing (Senior Required)

This course revolves around the close and critical reading of, in-depth discourse on, and formal essay writing in response to world literature from a variety of eras and authors. The first semester focuses on classical and medieval works while the second semester moves from Shakespeare to major works of the twentieth century. Writing instruction continually reviews the basic elements of composition learned in the previous three years while moving the students toward a command of more sophisticated techniques and complex skills. Students write frequent analytical essays based on assigned literary texts and occasional informal personal essays. Core Works include: Greek Tragedies, The Infern, Hamlet, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The Stranger, and Dubliners, among others.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition (Senior Elective)

The Advanced Placement English course is a more intensive version of the regular senior English class. As such, students study a greater number of works in more depth. Its aim is to broaden the students’ understanding and appreciation of the sophisticated themes and distinguishing stylistic differences in literature. The course is a preparation for the Advanced Placement examination in English Language and Literature. Core works include: Greek Tragedies, Hamlet, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The Stranger, and Dubliners, among others.
Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.
Prerequisite: Permission of Junior English teacher, AP English teacher and English Department.

1 Credit/full year

Creative Writing I (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course offers students the opportunity to develop competence in the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. All students in the course complete written assignments in these three genres and develop a substantial independent project in one of them. The course seeks to develop both aesthetic appreciation and accomplished performance in writing. Students also study related creative fields, including the fine arts, music, film, and computer multi-media. Publication is an important emphasis in the course.
Prerequisite: Sophomores and Juniors may apply with permission of instructor.

.5 Credit/semester

Creative Writing II (Senior Elective)

This workshop style course consists of engaging in critical discussion of student poetry or fiction and presenting written review of the work up for discussion. Other elements of the course include outside reading suggested by the instructor that could help shape the student’s work and editing of and hopeful publication in Gazebo.
Prerequisite: Creative Writing I and permission of the English Department.

.5 Credit/semester

Shakespeare (Junior / Senior Elective)

NOTE: This course will be offered on alternating years with Baseball in Literature in academic years beginning with an odd-numbered year.
This course is designed for the student who would like to further his knowledge and appreciation of the dramatic works of William Shakespeare. The course focuses on a close reading of six to eight plays not normally done in the regular English classes, focusing on common themes and ideas in the plays and in Shakespeare’s dramatic technique. There will also be opportunity for students to see the plays via video and live performance.

.5 Credit/semester

Harlem Renaissance (Junior / Senior Elective)

NOTE: This course will be offered on alternating years with Classic and Renaissance Literature in academic years beginning with an even-numbered year.
This course, open to juniors and seniors, introduces students to the literature, history, and culture of the Harlem Renaissance. It includes works of fiction and non-fiction by representative Harlem Renaissance writers, including, but not limited to, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jesse Faucet, Alain Locke, Langston Hughes, Nella Larson, Countee Cullen, Zora Neal Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, Wallace Thurman, and Walter White. In addition, each student researches and presents a topic that relates to the Harlem Renaissance.

.5 Credit/semester

Classic and Renaissance Literature (Junior / Senior Elective)

NOTE: This course will be offered on alternating years with Harlem Renaissance in academic years beginning with an odd-numbered year.
This English elective course will begin with ancient literature and conclude with several works of the Renaissance period. Major literary developments of ancient, medieval, and renaissance literature will be examined through the analysis of poetry, epic, mythology, historic narrative, and the development of narrative prose (novel). The course will question established notions of Hellenistic, Medieval, and Renaissance periods through close readings of works by Ovid, Homer, Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Machiavelli.

.5 Credit/semester

Baseball in Literature (Junior / Senior Elective)

NOTE: This course will be offered on alternating years with Shakespeare in academic years beginning with an even-numbered year.
For more than a century, many of America’s greatest writers have used baseball as a means to examine American life. This one semester course will investigate the portrayal of baseball in literature and how that depiction serves as a mirror for and a lens to the national and human experiences. The course will utilize a variety of fiction and non-fiction literary forms to aid in the exploration of how baseball has served as a primary metaphor in the modern artistic response to a host of social and personal issues.

.5 Credit/semester

Public Speaking (Sophomore, Junior, Senior Elective)

This course is for the student who wants to acquire self-confidence and poise while developing formal oral communication skills. Emphasis is placed on speech structure, organization, research, and delivery required in public speaking. The student is encouraged to develop his own thoughts, feelings and personal attitudes into an effective message.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Public Speaking: Interpretation, Rhetoric, and Arugmentation (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is designed for the student looking to develop advanced public speaking skills. Specifically this course will concentrate on various techniques interpreting literature, the construction of sound arguments, recognition of logical fallacies, advanced persuasion techniques, and the refutation of arguments. Additional emphasis will be placed on both verbal and physical delivery skills. This course meets every other day for the entire school year.
Prerequisite: Approval by instructor required

.5 Credit/semester

English Faculty

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Dennis Bloh

Dennis Bloh
Faculty Member, Assistant Coach, Swimming, Moderator, Gazebo
English Department

Alex Brown

Alex Brown
Faculty Member, Assistant Coach, Varsity Basketball
English Department

Joseph Dempsey

Joseph Dempsey
Faculty Member, Head Coach, Varsity Basketball
English Department

Matthew Derrick

Matthew Derrick
Class of 2002
Faculty Member, LIGHTS Team Member, Assistant Coach, Soccer, Assistant Coach, Indoor Track, Assistant Coach, Track and Field, Moderator, Pep Band
English Department, LIGHTS Team

To learn Mathematics is to partake of a subject that is both an Art and a Science, an enterprise that is both discovered and invented, a unique field that, according to Bertrand Russell, “possesses not only truth but supreme beauty.” To study Mathematics is to align yourself with the greatest minds of all past civilizations in the never ending quest of understanding our physical world. To some the motivation is practical, to solve some immediate problems; while to others, the attraction is pure curiosity and fascination. To all who have the perseverance to delve beneath the surface, Mathematics offers rewarding insights and surprising inter-dependencies.


Mathematics Courses Offered

Algebra I (Freshman Required)

This course provides a thorough foundation in elementary algebra by developing an understanding of the central ideas of variable and function, and the ability to use the language and tools of algebraic thinking to describe mathematical relations and analyze problems of many types. In addition, focus and emphasis are placed on enabling students to integrate the concepts of functions, equations, and graphs in order to apply the concepts to a variety of mathematical and real world situations, thereby further developing their critical thinking and problem solving abilities.

1 Credit/full year

Algebra I Y (Freshman)

Algebra 1Y is a course provided for ninth grade students who, in the opinion of the math department, need a modified course in first-year algebra. This course gives special attention to reinforcement of basic arithmetic concepts while covering the foundations in elementary algebra.

1 Credit/full year

Integrated Algebra I and II

This is an accelerated course in elementary algebra 1 and 2 concepts intended for freshmen who have a strong foundation in some Algebra 1 topics but do not qualify to take Algebra 2. The usual topics of algebra 1 and 2 are treated with an emphasis on concepts and structure rather than on how to proceed. Most important is that this course introduces the student to abstract mathematical thought and also to solving problems from algebra 1 and 2 concepts. A lot of time is spent on blending these topics to advance students more quickly to a Geometry course. By the end of the year, the students should reach a level of insight and mathematical instinct that will enable them to proceed comfortably through the rest of the Algebra 2 topics not covered in this course as well as the Geometry concepts covered in subsequent course: Integrated Algebra 2 and Geometry.

Algebra I Honors (Freshman)

This is an accelerated course in elementary algebra intended for students who have a high degree of ability and interest. The usual topics of algebra are treated with an emphasis on concepts and structure rather than on how to proceed. Most important is that this course introduces the student to abstract mathematical thought and also to solving non-routine problems. A lot of time is spent on supplementary problems taken from various contests which enhance a student’s perception and problem solving skills. By the end of the year, the students should reach a level of insight and mathematical instinct that will enable them to proceed comfortably through subsequent upper level advanced courses.

1 Credit/full year

Algebra II (Freshman / Sophomore)

This course continues the arithmetic generalizations begun in Algebra 1 and explores more deeply the operations that relate numbers to one another. The students are encouraged to think of algebra as a symbolic language and to use it as a modeling tool to explore other areas of mathematics. The students gain an understanding of number systems by examining and using the operations for relating numbers. The use of graphing calculators helps students to visualize algebraic concepts.

1 Credit/full year

Algebra II Y (Junior)

Algebra 2 is a continuation of the basic concepts and skills of Algebra 1. The pace of this course enables students with difficulties in math to gain a better understanding of algebraic topics. Various learning approaches and active involvement during each lesson will be critical to a student’s success. In this course, students will learn the practical applications of concepts and much of their learning will include technology, primarily with the graphing calculator. Throughout the course of the year, students will work with equations, inequalities, linear systems, matrices, factoring, radicals, polynomials, relations, functions, and various other topics.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Calculus BC (Senior Elective)

This course is a more intensive examination of the basic concepts of Calculus for students who have already had Calculus AB or Introductory Calculus. The syllabus prescribed by the College Board in their BC program is covered in depth. The ideas of limits, derivatives and integrals are rigorously defined, exploring applications of each, using various teaching techniques. Besides a deeper understanding of basic Calculus through challenging applications, a wide scope of additional topics are examined, especially infinite series and differential equations.
Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.
Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Calculus AB and department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Algebra II Honors (Freshman / Sophomore)

This is an accelerated advanced algebra course open to superior students. It is demanding, treating the usual topics of Algebra 2 and applying these topics to problem solving. The content covered and skills acquired in this course enable the student to advance to Geometry/Precalculus Honors.
Prerequisite: Minimum B+ in Algebra 1 Honors and department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Geometry (Junior)

“How do I know what I know?” Geometry asks and answers this question more so than any other area of mathematical study. Within the framework of Euclidean geometry, students will develop the ability to deductively and inductively reason their way through a process by working through geometric proofs. Through construction and computer software, students ultimately will learn to recognize the workings of one geometric concept within another one, thus observing the symbiotic relationships among geometric tenets.
Prerequisite: Algebra 2

1 Credit/full year

Geometry Y (Recommended Sophomores)

This is a slower-paced Geometry course offered to sophomores who have completed an Algebra I or I Y Course and are recommended for a four-year math program ending with Trigonometry. Sophomores selected for this course will take Algebra2/Trigonometry Part 1 as juniors, and Algebra 2/Trigonometry Part 2 as seniors. Students learn the tenets of Euclidean Geometry and apply these concepts to the solutions of real-world problems. Emphasis is placed on the development of reasoning skills and the use of logic. Effective study of topics is facilitated by the incorporation of a “master notebook,” which strengthens organization and basic study skills.
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1 or Algebra 1Y only with teacher recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Geometry / Precalculus Honors (Sophomore / Junior)

This course is a highly accelerated honors curriculum involving Geometry, Trigonometry and Precalculus courses. This course must be taught at an accelerated pace to cover the enormous volume of material in a full year. Sophomores and juniors and a few exceptional freshmen are asked to do a large amount of work and study on their own time to absorb the extent and depth of the material.
Prerequisite: Minimum B+ in Algebra 2 Honors and department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Trigonometry (Senior Elective)

This is a traditional fourth year mathematics course for college-bound students who are not expecting to take Calculus at the collegiate level. The course will cover trigonometric functions and their applications for one semester, and introductory, non-Calculus based statistics for the other semester.
Note: Students intending to major in Mathematics, Engineering, Science, or Business are strongly encouraged to take Precalculus so that they are prepared to take Calculus in college.
Prerequisite: Algebra 2, Geometry, and departmental approval

.5 Credit/Semester

Statistics (Senior Elective)

This is a traditional fourth-year mathematics course for college-bound students who may look to go into a business, mathematical or other applicable field where statistics would be a required course. The course load will consist of introductory, non-Calculus based statistics.
Note: Students intending to major in Mathematics, Engineering, Science, or Business are strongly encouraged to take Precalculus so that they are prepared to take Calculus in college.
Prerequisite: Algebra 2, Geometry, and departmental approval

.5 Credit/semester

Algebra III / Trigonometry (Senior Elective)

This course is a continuation of the core curriculum designed for those students who have difficulty in mathematics. This is a slower-paced Algebra II course, beginning with the development of both linear and quadratic functions. Sets of real and complex numbers will be developed as well as systems of equations. Polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions are studied in depth. A full course in Trigonometry follows. The six functions of angle measurements within the triangle, graphing the trig functions and the properties of right and oblique triangles will be studied.
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 (Y)

1 Credit/full year

Precalculus (Junior / Senior Elective)

This is a traditional fourth-year mathematics course for college-bound students. The course continues with the concept of functions, working extensively with trigonometric functions and their applications, along with exponential and logarithmic functions. The concepts and applications of series and sequences, matrices and probability are fully developed.
Prerequisite: C- or higher in Algebra 2, Geometry, and department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Statistics (Junior / Senior Elective)

The AP Statistics course is designed to provide you with a learning experience equivalent to an introductory college, non-calculus-based course in statistics and will introduce you to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The equivalent introductory college statistics class is typically required for majors in the fields of social sciences, health sciences, and business. This course is also an effective preparation for science, engineering, and mathematics majors whose course curriculum usually dictates upper-level calculus-based statistics. Technology will be utilized in the form of computers, computer software, and graphing calculators. Students will engage in constructing their own knowledge through the incorporation of lab activities, group problem-solving, student projects, and class presentations.
Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.
Prerequisite: Minimum A- in Algebra 2 Honors, minimum A in Algebra 2, and department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Calculus (Senior Elective)

This course reviews analytic topics and proceeds to the study of differential calculus with applications to curve sketching, optimization, and related rates. Integrals are studied as they relate to derivatives with applications to area and volume. The calculus of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions are examined. Problem solving skills are developed, especially in the life sciences, physics, economics and finance.
Prerequisite: Department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Calculus AB (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is a preparation for the advanced placement Calculus AB examination. The syllabus is that prescribed by the College Board in their Calculus AB program. The ideas of limits, derivatives, and integrals are rigorously defined with appropriate applications and techniques.
Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.
Prerequisite: Minimum B+ in Geometry/Precalculus Honors and department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Mathematics Faculty

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Patrick Carney

Patrick Carney
Faculty and Staff
Mathematics Department

Micky Dominick

Micky Dominick
Faculty and Staff
Mathematics Department, Lasallian Mission & Ministry Office

Patrick Heasley

Patrick Heasley
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Mathematics Department

Thomas Lang

Thomas Lang
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Mathematics Department

Recognizing that students come to La Salle with a wide variety of musical backgrounds, the La Salle Music Department offers courses at a variety of levels of musical ability so as to provide an appropriate course of instruction to all. The beginning or intermediate instrumental musician will participate in the Introductory Music Performance Ensemble or the Intermediate Stage Band, groups designed to give students facility in performing moderately difficult music material. The more advanced musician progresses to participation in Advanced Stage Band or the Honors Advanced Music, more skilled groups dedicated to exploring a variety of musical styles, including jazz and contemporary compositions. Wherever appropriate, students also participate in the La Salle Concert Band, an organization that is given extensive instruction in classical as well as contemporary expression. Students with interest in studying vocal music may participate in chorus. Chorus classes are available at different skill levels, including freshman, intermediate, beginning upper classmen, and advanced chorus. All performance courses include units in music theory. A strong point of the La Salle Music Program is the incorporation of private instruction into the student’s daily roster. All students are given private instruction by a well-trained core of professional musicians dedicated to the art of developing the vocal and instrumental talents of each student. A student with special music interests may pursue these interests via a series of independently supervised programmed instruction. At La Salle, music is considered to be an integral part of the student’s education.


Music Courses Offered

Introductory Music Performance (Freshman Band Elective)

This course provides the beginning student musician an opportunity to develop his musicianship through ensemble performance of jazz and related idioms. The student rehearses and performs beginners’ arrangements from the big band repertoire. The course introduces the student to the fundamentals of music theory, jazz improvisation, and the early history of jazz.
Prerequisite: Selection by the department, based upon audition. Co-requisite: Enrollment in Music 806, Instrumental Instruction

1 Credit/full year

Instrumental Instruction (Elective)

Instrumental Instruction provides the student individual lessons on the instrument of the student’s choice. Students are instructed in the techniques specific to his instrument and to his own ability level. Weekly assignments are given at each lesson and the student is expected to prepare these assignments to be evaluated at the following lesson. Because each student brings a different level of competency, progress is closely monitored as to keep the student advancing at a pace appropriate to his ability level. Within this course, and in addition to individual instruction, students are expected to participate in Concert Band and/or Pep Band, excluding strings, piano and guitar. Both ensemble rehearsal schedules do not conflict with any other classroom activity.

.5 Credit/full year

Advanced Music Studies (Elective)

In this independent-study course, students are invited to explore the following topics: music theory (an in-depth introduction to the fundamentals of music theory), harmony (an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of tonal harmony) and musical forms and analysis (an introduction to the basic elements in musical form and the principles of form analysis).

.5 Credit/full year

Small Ensembles (Elective)

Small Ensemble is a course dedicated to chamber ensemble performance which is divided into 2 classes. The first being String Ensemble and the other Guitar Ensemble. Students will learn about respective music repertoire, the specifics and history of the literature. Both ensembles are required to perform at least 2 concerts a year. Students will be evaluated on their preparation and performance of the required music as well as progress in their weekly private instruction.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status; department approval. Co-requisite: Enrollment in Music 806, Instrumental Instruction

1 Credit/full year

R&B, Funk and Latin Concepts (Elective)

This course is designed to introduce the students to the great “Horn Bands” of the 70’s and 80’s, as well as the famous Salsa Bands throughout history by rehearsing and performing the actual orchestrations of these famous groups as well as original compositions in the style of Tower of Power; Earth, Wind and Fire; Tito Puente and many others. Classes have the option of splitting up into 2 ensembles. Because of the advanced level of this class, enrollment is by teacher recommendation only.
Prerequisite: Music 802, 804, 820 or 850; department approval. Co-requisite: Music 806.

1 Credit/full year

Music Business and Technology (Elective)

This course is designed to instruct students in the area of recording technology as related to individual projects as well as recording, engineering and mastering the projects of others. The first semester will focus on the correct use of microphones (mic techniques, placement, selection), Garage Band, Pro Tools, and other related recording software. After the student has a good understanding of the tools during the first semester, students will focus on a collaborative project that will be recorded, mastered and engineered. That collaborative project will be completed by the end of the second semester.

.5 Credit/full year

Advanced Music Performance (Stage Band Elective)

Advanced Music Performance is the next level of ensemble performance following Introductory Music Performance 802. This course will take the student to the next musical level. Through advanced arrangements and a more in depth look into jazz improvisation, the student will further develop his soloing skills as well as his sight reading skills. Students will be required to participate in at least two public performances a year. The student will be evaluated on his performance of the music as well as progress in his weekly private instruction.
Prerequisite: Music 802, 804 or 820 and selection by department, based upon audition. Corequisite: Music 806.

1 Credit/full year

Honors Advanced Music (Elective)

Honors Advanced Music is the highest level of large ensemble offered. Students in this class are selected by teacher recommendation. In addition to a vigorous course load, most musicians are expected to participate in many performances throughout the school year. Through professional arrangements, students will be taught advanced jazz improvisation as well as challenging each student to his greatest potential.
Prerequisite: Audition only. Co-requisite: Music 806.

1 Credit/full year

Freshman Chorus (Elective)

This course is designed to equip freshman with the musical tools necessary to be an active participant in the music department at La Salle. Issues covered include the changing voice, reading music, and vocal production in addition to rehearsing and performing as a choral ensemble. Most repertoire is sung in two to four parts. Students are expected to memorize music when requested and are to attend all rehearsals and performances.

.5 Credit/full year

Chorus (Elective: All Levels)

In this course, students learn and perform a wide variety of music, including: folk, classical, jazz, and contemporary music. This course is designed to equip students with the necessary musical tools, including reading music and vocal production, in addition to rehearsing and performing as a choral ensemble to help students be an active participant in the music department at La Salle. Most of the repertoire is sung in three or four parts. Students are expected to memorize music when requested and are to attend all rehearsals and performances.
Prerequisite: Department approval; based upon audition.

.5 Credit/full year

Advanced Chorus (Elective: All Levels)

In this course, students learn and perform a wide variety of music, including: folk, classical, jazz, barbershop, and contemporary music. This course is designed to equip students with the necessary musical tools, including reading music and vocal production, in addition to rehearsing and performing as a choral ensemble to help students be an active participant in the music department at La Salle. Students who have auditioned and have been accepted for Belcrofters are eligible for Advanced Chorus. Most repertoire is sung in four or more parts. Students are expected to memorize music when requested and are to attend all rehearsals and performances.
Prerequisite: Based upon audition.

.5 Credit/full year

Independent Chorus (Independent Study, Elective: All Levels)

In this course, students learn and perform a wide variety of music, including: folk, classical, jazz, and contemporary music. This course is designed to equip students with the necessary musical tools, including reading music and vocal production, in addition to rehearsing and performing as a choral ensemble to help students be an active participant in the music department at La Salle. Most repertoire is sung in four or more parts. Students are expected to memorize music when requested and are to attend all rehearsals and performances. All students will arrange private instruction with La Salle’s Choral Director and attend all rehearsals with the full ensemble as concert season approaches.

.5 Credit/full year

Music Faculty

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Joseph Ciccimaro

Joseph Ciccimaro
Class of 1957
Faculty and Staff, Alumni
Music Department

Paul Gehman

Paul Gehman
Faculty and Staff
Music Department

Susan Lerner

Susan Lerner
Faculty and Staff
Music Department

Daniel Muller

Daniel Muller
Faculty and Staff
Music Department

The Visual Arts program of La Salle College High School is designed for all students who have an interest in investigating and experiencing different techniques based on the principles of art and design. The Arts are an integral part of each student’s education. Students are presented with a series of challenges requiring observation, reflection, and experimentation. From these challenges, students develop their own responses to problems and learn to express themselves visually through the art studio process.


Visual Arts Courses Offered

Foundations Art (Freshman Elective)

This course is offered to students interested in a variety of authentic art making experiences. The focus is on design as students gain experience in idea development through research and experimentation. Drawing is the lead off to assembling, painting, sculpting, ceramics, printmaking, paper crafts and presenting.

.5 Credit/full year (meets 3/6 days)

Drawing 1 (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is structured to give students a working knowledge of drawing as a visual language. Traditional and experimental techniques are emphasized through observation and experimentation. Building a portfolio of work, students experience a variety of media, including graphite, charcoal, collage, pastel, conté crayon, India ink, and mixed media. Students learn through investigation, practice, and writing to develop ideas in drawing, articulate imagery, interpret three-dimensional reality on a two-dimensional plane, and push beyond pre-conceived self-limits.

.5 Credit/semester

Drawing 2 (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

Drawing 2 focuses on experimenting with drawing styles and developing creative autonomy to drawing. Exploring themes in composition, portraiture and gesture drawing are included with mixed media and digital media as a means to experimental processes. These could include: layered drawings with textural and relief qualities, distortion, reflection, gesture, use of color, monotypes and transparencies. Research, visual documentation, compositional studies, and goal setting shape the course experience.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing 1

.5 Credit/semester

Painting 1 (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is structured to give students a working knowledge of painting techniques, and applying principles of color theory and design. Using a variety of media, students explore landscapes, still life, portraiture, graphic and abstract design. Researching and documenting examples in class and beyond the classroom, students create goals, practice in studio, and participate in group discussions. Students learn to integrate language and analysis along with the painting process.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing 1.

1 Credit/full year

Painting 2 (Junior / Senior Elective)

Painting 2 focuses on broadening the range of painting experiences to include expression, dimension, relief, and abstraction. Students will be challenged to intensify their investigation of color, form, and surface through the studio process and through research on artists and art forms. The course materials include watercolor, acrylic, mixed media, paper, panel and canvas painting.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing 1 and Painting 1.

1 Credit/full year

Ceramics 1 (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

An introduction of the techniques and history of ceramics and the creation of pieces in three-dimensional form. Basic hand building techniques will be taught with low fired clay bodies, glazing techniques, and kiln firing processes.

.5 Credit/semester

Ceramics 2 (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

An introduction to throwing clay on the pottery wheel. Students are encouraged to start with cylinders to perfect centering of the clay. Hand building techniques will be incorporated to enlarge or embellish pieces thrown on the wheel.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Ceramics 1.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Ceramics (Independent Study, Senior Elective)

This is an independent study offered to seniors who have completed Ceramics 1 and 2. The student must make arrangements with the teacher for class availability. Students are encouraged to explore history and culture to develop a personal artistic style.
Prerequisite: By arrangement with teacher.

1 Credit/full year

Sculpture 1 (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

Sculpture is the art of using many different materials to transform an idea into a three-dimensional form. Students will be introduced to both traditional and contemporary form-making to produce sculptures that reflect their ideas and society.

.5 Credit/semester

Sculpture 2 (Junior / Senior Elective)

Sculpture 2 allows students to create three-dimensional forms by perfecting techniques to take on additional merit and refinement. By exploring movement, balance, scale, and weight, students will have the availability to create larger pieces that reflect their ideas.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Sculpture (Independent Study, Senior Elective)

An independent study offered to seniors who have completed Sculpture 1 and 2. Students will investigate traditional materials and processes to expand their understanding of three-dimensional forms. Exploration of new methods and materials will help students enhance a personal response to their work.
Prerequisite: By arrangement with teacher.

1 Credit/full year

Art Portfolio (Independent Study, Senior Elective)

Art Portfolio specifically addresses those students who are seeking a career in art and wish to apply to a college level art program, or who value visual arts as a self-defining skill. This course includes targeting those areas that need strengthening in each student’s artistic development and working towards creating a strong and cohesive body of work. Students who are enrolled in Art Portfolio are strongly urged to attend the annual National Portfolio day in the fall and have the option to take an additional art studio classes in supplemental pre-college programs.

1 Credit/full year

Visual Arts Faculty

Michael Hearn

Michael Hearn
Faculty and Staff
Art Department

Barbara Miller

Barbara Miller
Faculty and Staff
Art Department

The Religion Department of La Salle College High School encourages and promotes the philosophy of the school as a Catholic High School. St. John Baptist de La Salle's ideals and example animate the religious education program at La Salle.

To paraphrase St. John Baptist de La Salle: God our creator not only gives us our very human nature, but God also desires that we come to know what is eternally true and valuable. True knowledge of God and the meaning of faith is revealed to us through Jesus Christ and the Church. So the study of Religion is important because it provides us with true knowledge about God and the light of faith. This knowledge and light are the means through which the world will be transformed to be in conformity with the will of God our creator.


Religion Courses Offered

Growing in Christ (Freshman Required)

The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In this course students will study Scriptures that identify Jesus Christ as God’s ultimate Revelation to us. In learning about who Jesus is, the students will also learn who Jesus calls them to be. In addition, students will be given a foundational introduction to the life and work of St. La Salle and the Christian Brothers.

1 Credit/full year

Understanding Christ (Sophomore Required)

This course is designed to help students understand that in and through the Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by Him through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn not so much about events in the life of the Church but about the sacred nature of the Church.

1 Credit/full year

Christian Morality (Junior Required)

This course examines a number of topics that are integral to the rich Roman Catholic tradition of the moral life. Centered in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the course explores such topics as law, sexuality, the commandments, honesty, freedom and responsibility, the act of conscience, the honor due to God, the nature of sin and reconciliation. The course presents a method for moral decision-making as it challenges students to examine and pattern their lives in the light of the Gospel and Catholic Social Teaching.

1 Credit/full year

Christian Lifestyles (Senior Elective)

This course examines various Christian lifestyles, attempting to meet the needs of older adolescents, as they approach the most important decisions of their lives, the choice of their vocation, their unique calling in life. The four lifestyles include single life, the priesthood, the religious life (such as the Christian Brothers), and Christian marriage. The student investigates the impact that these vocations have in the Roman Catholic Church and in society. The students study Pope Paul VI’s encyclical, Humanae Vitae, as well as the Catholic Church’s teachings on the sacramental dimension of marriage, interfaith marriages, annulments, and the preparations necessary for a Catholic wedding. Reflective papers on the various lifestyles and the preparation of a one-year budget, which focuses on the economic demands of single and married life, contribute a practical aspect to the course.

Prayer (Senior Elective)

This course provides the students with knowledge of the importance of formal, informal, and liturgical prayer in the Roman Catholic Christian community along with an understanding and realization of the importance of prayer in their own lives. The students are encouraged to see prayer as it is connected to the realization of their communion with themselves, God, and the Christian community.

World Religions (Senior Elective)

Students study the world’s great religions, including Hinduism, Zen, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, and Islam. Sacred works, rituals, and the prayer life of these different faiths, as expressed today and in the past, are studied. These major religions, as well as Roman Catholicism, are investigated in terms of their representations and interactions in a pluralistic American society. Course material, lectures, and presentations are consistent with the teaching of the Catholic Church, respecting the varieties of religious expression, while also advancing essential Catholic teaching and practice.

Lasallian Spirituality and Service (Senior Elective)

This course examines the relationship between Lasallian Spirituality and service to the poor through education. Two aims of the course are: 1) understanding the practical spirituality of St. John Baptist de La Salle as being the presence and action of God in relationship to others; and 2) practicing this spirituality by fulfilling a course service requirement of fifteen hours in an educational ministry. Course work includes selected readings, on line research, reflective writing, and class presentations.

Religion Faculty

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Christian Arellano

Christian Arellano
Faculty and Staff
Religion Department

Mark Chesnik

Mark Chesnik
Parents, Faculty and Staff
Religion Department, Lasallian Mission & Ministry Office

Lewis Clark

Lewis Clark
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Religion Department, Lasallian Mission & Ministry Office, LIGHTS Team

Mark Collins

Mark Collins
Faculty and Staff
Religion Department

The Social Studies Department at La Salle College High School offers a program of study centered upon the importance and significance of history. All students take a three-year sequence of survey courses in World Civilizations, Western Civilization and United States History. Within these surveys, students are introduced to the rise, development, and organization of great civilizations. Completing these core courses then leads the students to study the great issues of the 21st century. Students search for meaning in the past by using a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, in both print and electronic. Writing is used extensively across the Social Studies department curriculum. This will provide opportunities for students to explain, evaluate, and criticize the ideas and actions of people across time and cultures. The department offers six Advanced Placement courses, with two available as early as sophomore year. The department offers a series of electives in the Social Sciences and History in which sophomores, juniors and seniors continue historical investigation, at an academic level consistent with introductory college work.


Social Studies Courses Offered

World Civilizations (Freshman Required)

This is the required course for freshmen. The course surveys the history and cultures of the world from the dawn of civilization to 1815 C.E. with attention to major cultural, social, religious, economic, and political trends within each civilization. The course follows the rise of great civilizations across the globe, and analyzes how they flourished, as well as the problems they encountered. The emergence of European civilization is set within a larger framework of civilizations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and interactions between or among civilizations are emphasized. Special topics include exploring cultural diversity, technological achievements, competition for supremacy, and the influence of religion among different civilizations in the ancient world. By the end of freshmen year each student should have a strong sense of how civilizations developed and flourished as people from different civilizations interacted through migration, conquest and trade. The student will also gain an understanding of human, cultural, social, economic, intellectual, religious and political development of world civilizations.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Human Geography (Freshman)

This course is an elective course for selected freshmen as an introduction to the study of Human Geography. The course prepares the students to take the Advanced Placement Human Geography exam in the spring. AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human use, understanding, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. The course goals include the use and analysis of maps and spatial data, recognizing and interpreting the relationships among patterns and processes in multiple scales, defining regions and evaluating the regionalization process, and characterizing and analyzing changing interconnections among places. The course seeks to accomplish these goals while blending the academic rigor and challenge of an introductory college course at a pace and academic maturity level for advanced high school freshmen. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.

1 Credit/full year

Western Civilizations (Sophomore Required)

This is the required course for sophomores. The course introducesthe student to the political, economic, and social phases of the 20th century western world. The course focuses on the events, ideas and people who shaped the future of this modern world. It begins with the major causes that brought about World War I and then continues chronologically to include the rise of communism, the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism, World War II, the Holocaust, Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, as well as the rise of the European Union. The first part of the course then ends by looking at the initiation of terrorism in the modern era. The second part of the sophomore year is the introduction of the three-semester study of United States history which will continue in the student’s junior year. This one-semester introduction to United States history looks at the United States from its revolutionary origins through its constructional period, examines its economic growth and the slavery question, and ends with one of the turning points in United States history the Civil War. Major components of the sophomore course will be the close reading of primary and secondary sources, critical writing, and careful class discussion of different historical ideas as well as their interpretations.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement World History (Sophomore Elective)

This course is an elective course for selected sophomores as a second part of a two-year curriculum on world civilizations. The course prepares the students to take the Advanced Placement World History examination in the spring. The course uses factual knowledge, geographic study, and interpretive analysis from both primary and secondary sources in order to gain a greater understanding of the change and continuity of global history. The course covers topics from ancient civilizations to the current world. It employs both a chronological as well as thematic perspective as it looks at World History. The course develops topics that will include a review of issues, ideas and events that were studied in the first year of World Civilizations before moving onto the major material of the Advanced Placement course. The topics include the Emergence of Western Europe and the Atlantic economy, the rise of Russia and the Soviet Union, the revolutions and reactions in Latin America, the African Diaspora and the Atlantic slave trade, the development of the Muslim world in Africa and the Middle East, the social and economic transitions in China and Japan, the history and development of the Indian sub-continent, and East Asia and the Pacific Rim in the contemporary world. The course ends with a critical look at globalization. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Departmental approval, a 3.75 G.P.A., and teacher’s recommendation and a selection test.

1 Credit/full year

United States History (Junior Required)

This is the required course for juniors. The course develops selected topics and issues in United States history from the reconstruction period to post-Civil War western expansion. The course then looks more in depth at the late 19th century, including the Gilded Age, the rise of American cities, and the rise of American imperialism. The student then moves into the 20th century by looking at the growth of American technology, the Roaring Twenties, the stock market crash, the depression, and the New Deal. United States History then moves into the modern era by exploring the United States’ entry into World War II, the atomic age, and the Cold War. It introduces the Civil Rights Era and United States involvement in the Vietnam War and ends by looking at the Reagan years. By using primary and secondary sources, and through discussion and writing, the junior student will develop his own interpretations and conclusions about United State history. The student then during their course of study comes to appreciate the major topics, issues, and personalities that have helped transform the post-Civil War United States into a major power in the 21st century.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement United States History (Junior Elective)

This course is an elective for selected juniors. The course prepares the students for the Advanced Placement examination in United States History. The Advanced Placement United States History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials presented in United States History. Among the topics to be discussed are colonization, revolution, the Constitution, the Civil War, reconstruction, the Gilded Age, progressivism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and Civil Rights. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An Advanced Placement United States History course should thus developsthe skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Admission to the class requires departmental approval based on teacher recommendation, a multiple choice test, and writing sample. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Departmental approval, a 3.5 G.P.A., and teacher’s recommendation and selection test.

1 Credit/full year

Economics (Junior / Senior Elective)

This is an elective open to juniors and seniors. This is a one-semester course that will give students a basic understanding of the principles of microeconomic theory. It emphasizes the fundamental terms, concepts, and processes of economic study that apply to individual decision makers, both consumers and producers. Students learn to research, analyze, and apply solutions to a variety of economic problems. Some major topics include: cost and benefit analysis, supply and demand, perfect and imperfect markets, and private and government policy.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Placement Economics (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is an elective for selected juniors and seniors. The course is divided into two sections: Advanced Placement Microeconomics and Advanced Placement Macroeconomics. The purpose of an Advanced Placement course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The following ideas and topics will be discussed and explored in depth: basic economic concepts, the nature and functions of product markets, factor markets, and market failure and the role of government. The second part of the course is in macroeconomics. The purpose of an Advanced Placement course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. There is no single approach that an Advanced Placement macroeconomics course is expected to follow. The following ideas and topics will be discussed and explored in depth: basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, the financial sector, inflation, unemployment, and stabilization policies, economic growth and productivity, open economy, international trade and finance. Admission to the class requires departmental approval based on teacher recommendation. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Modern European History (Junior / Senior Elective)

The course is an elective for selected sophomore, junior, and seniors. The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of Advanced Placement European History are to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and an ability to express historical understanding in writing. Admission to the class requires departmental approval based on teacher recommendation, a multiple choice test, and writing sample. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Department approval through teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Psychology (Senior Elective)

This course is a one-semester course that is only open to seniors, and will provide students with a general orientation looking toward the methods, content areas, and central findings of psychology. All students will get an understanding of psychology as a science, as well as an art, demonstrating psychology’s application in people’s daily living. The course looks closely at three major areas of the thinking in psychology: analytic, creative, and practical, all of which include both cognitive and affective abilities.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Placement Psychology (Senior Elective)

This course is an elective course for selected juniors and seniors. The Advanced Placement Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The following is a sampling of topics which will be covered: history and approaches, research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology, personality, testing and individual differences, abnormal behavior, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. The student learns about and discusses ethical issues as well as the laboratory methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Departmental approval through teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

History of Vietnam (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is for juniors and seniors and focuses on the history of Vietnam and the region of the world known as Southeast Asia. The course’s focal point is on the geography, history, and culture of Vietnam. It also will center on American involvement from its aid to the French, through the fall of Saigon, to the normalization of relations with Vietnam. The students will be expected to read extensively in primary and secondary sources, write short papers on the historiography of Vietnam, as well as research the life of a local Vietnam veteran. Literature both fiction and non-fiction are a major component of the course. A class trip to Washington, D.C. is a requirement of the course.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Placement American Government and Politics (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is an elective for selected juniors and seniors. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement test in United States Government and Politics. A well-designed Advanced Placement course in United States Government and Politics will give the students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret the United States Government and politics as well as the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. While there is no single approach that an Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics course must follow, students are acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. The following is a list of topics that will be covered: Constitution underpinnings of United States government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups and mass media, the institutions of national government, public policy, civil rights and civil liberties. In-class discussions of the above topics critically enhance the course content. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Department approval through teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Modern United States History: 1960 to the Present (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is a one-semester course that will provide students with a basic knowledge of the major themes, people, and events in the history of the United States from 1960 to the present. This course will sacrifice scope for depth. Students will study a period of time only fifty years long – just a flash in the historical perspective. But those fifty years have seen some of the most chaotic, contentious, heartwarming, triumphant, important, and fascinating events in the nation’s past. Beginning with a review of the Cold War, the course then begins with the election of 1960, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War, the rise of the Civil Rights Movement, the Space Race, Watergate, feminism, gay rights, environmentalism, the birth of the modern “hyper consumer” lifestyle, the New Left and the counterculture, the rise of the New Right and the national political shift from New Deal liberalism to conservatism. Students examine closely the Reagan Era, the Clinton years, 9/11 and the War on Terrorism, and end with the election of 2008. By the end of the semester, the students are confidently conversant about the major events, movements, and people of the era. Students also gain an understanding of historical trends, the ways in which ideas and beliefs have shifted over time. Finally, the students should have a passing familiarity with some of the various historical “schools of thought” in modern U.S. history, and the issues that historians of the era still debate. Prerequisite: Department approval through teacher’s recommendation.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics (Junior / Senior Elective)

Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. Comparison assists both in identifying problems and in analyzing policymaking. The course will cover specific countries and their governments. Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course. China, Great Britain, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia are all regularly covered in college-level introductory comparative politics courses. The inclusion of Iran adds a political system from a very important region of the world and one that is subject to distinctive political and cultural dynamics. By using these six core countries, the course can move the discussion of concepts from abstract definition to concrete example, noting that not all concepts will be equally useful in all country settings. Finally, comparison assists explanation. For example: Why are some countries stable democracies and not others? Why do many democracies have prime ministers instead of presidents? Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Department approval through teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Social Studies Faculty

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Vernard Abrams

Vernard Abrams
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Social Studies Department, Diversity Office

Gregory Bielecki

Gregory Bielecki
Class of 1999
Coaches, Faculty and Staff, Alumni
Social Studies Department, LIGHTS Team

Joseph Colistra

Joseph Colistra
Class of 1964
Faculty and Staff, Alumni
Social Studies Department

Thomas Devlin

Thomas Devlin
Class of 2000
Coaches, Faculty and Staff, Alumni
Social Studies Department

Our proficiency-oriented classes in world languages stress the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The context of the lessons helps students to understand and appreciate diverse cultures, which prepares them for life in a pluralistic society. Teachers use the target language as much as is appropriate to the level of the class. La Salle College High School requires a three-year sequence of high school level study in one language: Chinese, French, Italian, Latin, or Spanish. After the freshman year, students may elect to take a second world language along with their required modern language. For example, Latin is a popular elective that is taken along with another world language. All language courses are offered based on sufficient enrollment.


World Language Courses Offered

Spanish 1 (Freshman)

This proficiency-oriented course focuses on developing the language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The principal objectives of the course include practicing learned oral language skills in structured conversation, acquiring a strong foundation in Spanish vocabulary and grammar, and becoming familiar with the varied aspects of Hispanic culture.

1 Credit/full year

Spanish 2 (Freshman / Sophomore)

This course continues the development of proficiency in the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The Spanish 2 course builds on the language and grammar that was taught in the first year. The study of Hispanic culture is continued. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1 or equivalent.

1 Credit/full year

Spanish 2 Honors (Freshman / Sophomore)

This course continues the development of proficiency in the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The foundation of vocabulary and grammar of the Spanish 1 course is built upon. The study of Hispanic culture is continued. The content is similar to that of the regular Spanish 2 course, but the pace is accelerated, the expectation of classroom participation is higher, the evaluation of all skills, including oral proficiency, is stricter, and supplementary materials are added. Prerequisite: Final average of A- or higher in Spanish 1 and teacher recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Spanish 3 (Sophomore / Junior)

Spanish 3 immerses the student in a primarily Spanish-speaking environment by following the proficiency-based series utilized in Spanish 1 and 2. It is a course that completes the three-year sequence of the textbook series used in Spanish 1 and 2. Students progress from tightly guided exercises to less structured tasks in such a way that independence and confidence in oral and written communication are gradually achieved. At the Language 3 level, the students’ exploration of Culture (music, art, literature, and history) and everyday life continues to be integrated with their acquisition of language. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 2.

1 Credit/full year

Spanish 3 Honors (Sophomore / Junior)

The Spanish 3 Honors course is for the highly motivated student. The course continues the high expectations of the Honors program. This challenging course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish and students are expected to respond accordingly. Class participation is an important component. Accuracy of grammar, pronunciation and comprehension are emphasized. This course is a prerequisite for the Advanced Placement course, which ideally is taken in the student’s senior year. Culturally, students are exposed to a wider range and variety of topics and begin to read longer and more complicated literary selections. Prerequisite: Final average of B+ or higher in Spanish 2 Honors and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Spanish 4 (Junior / Senior)

The main goals of this course are to further the student’s proficiency in listening comprehension, conversation, reading and writing. Through videos, selected readings, and discussion, the student learns about the diversity of the people, customs, and cultural heritage of the Spanish-speaking countries, and also refines his pronunciation. There is an emphasis on learning to use the spoken and written language for everyday communication. Emphasis is also placed on learning about and understanding the culture and history of the countries where the language is spoken. The course includes a review of grammar where necessary and also explanations and practice of advanced grammar not included in the first three levels of study. Prerequisite: Final average of C in Spanish 3 and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Spanish 4 Honors (Junior / Senior)

This honors course serves as a capstone experience for the students who have navigated the first three levels of Spanish, including Spanish 3 Honors, with great success. Qualified juniors should take this course in preparation for AP Spanish in their senior year. The students will continue to develop all four language skills, with an emphasis on speaking and listening, as well as analyzing some of the more advanced grammatical structures. Cultural themes (e.g., music, film, art, and literature), current events and social justice issues in the Spanish-speaking world will be the context for the course. Spontaneous and interactive conversation, as well as varied performance assessments, will challenge the students. Prerequisite: Final average of B+ or higher in Spanish 3 Honors and teacher’s recommendation. *NOTE: This course is the preferred sequence for sophomores in Spanish 3 Honors. They may then take AP Spanish or Spanish 5 in their senior year.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Spanish (Senior)

The equivalent of a 300-level college course in Spanish conversation and composition, this course prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement examination of the College Board. The course stresses oral skills, listening comprehension, reading comprehension and composition in Spanish presented within the framework of Hispanic cultures. It offers academic, social and cultural insights so as to prepare students to think critically, to compare and contrast perspectives and practices between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking people. Extensive reading of and listening to authentic sources are used to engage student in the communicative tasks of making cultural connections and comparisons Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. 33 Prerequisite: Final average of A in Spanish 4 or A- or higher in Spanish 3 Honors or B+ or higher in Spanish 4 Honors, teacher’s recommendation, and completion of required summer work.

1 Credit/full year

Spanish 5 (Independent Study, Senior)

Spanish 5 is a literature course intended for students who have completed Spanish 4 Honors or AP Spanish in their junior year. There is a continued emphasis on developing proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish. . Prerequisite: Final average of A or higher in Spanish 4, B+ or higher in Spanish 4 Honors or AP Spanish, and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

French 1 (Freshman)

This course stresses basic grammar, practical vocabulary, and sentence structure with the aim of communication. The four basic skills are emphasized throughout the year: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The focus of this class is on real-life language use, the integration of French and Francophone culture and language. During class time, students should expect to engage in group and pair work, and to actively participate in class.

1 Credit/full year

French 2 (Freshman / Sophomore)

French 2 continues the development of basic proficiency in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing French. Through the video and CD program, students see and hear young French people going about their daily lives in Paris and other areas in France and the French-speaking world. The textbook and workbooks provide practical reading and writing practice. Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 1 or equivalent.

1 Credit/full year

French 3 (Sophomore / Junior)

This course continues to offer opportunities to improve the students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading and writing in French. Vocabulary is expanded, and students learn to express attitudes and opinions and to exchange information in a more complex manner using varied structures and expressions. Students continue to study on real-life language use, the integration of French and Francophone cultures and language along with the more advanced grammatical concepts. During class time, students should expect to engage in group or pair work. Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 2.

1 Credit/full year

French 3 Honors (Sophomore / Junior)

In addition to the accomplishing the French 3 goals, T the French 3 (H) student (1) demonstrates effective linguistic understanding and performance within given contexts for specific purposes; (2) takes risks when expressing himself in the language; (3) works toward and achieves higher levels of accuracy in using the basic structures of the language; (4) appreciates and can articulate the cultural contributions of different linguistic communities; (5) consistently exceeds the requirement when expressing himself in speaking and writing. Prerequisite: A- in French 2.

1 Credit/full year

French 4 (Senior)

This course furthers the student’s proficiency in writing, conversation, reading and listening. Through videos, selected readings, and discussions, the student learns about the diversity of the people, customs, and cultural heritage of French-speaking countries, and also refines his pronunciation. The focus of this class is on real-life language use, through the integration of French and French culture. Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 3.

1 Credit/full year

French 4 Honors (Senior)

In this course students continue to develop proficiency in writing, speaking reading and listening. The four basic skills are emphasized throughout the year as students expand their vocabulary while mastering more complex grammatical structures and creative writing. Students learn to write paragraphs and short essays through directed writing activities. Readings include short stories, poems, newspapers and movies which give students understanding of and insight into French history and culture. The focus of this class is on real-life language use, the integration of French and Francophone cultures and language. During class time, students should expect to engage in group or pair work. Prerequisite: Final average of B or higher in French 3, and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement French (Junior / Senior)

The equivalent of a 300 level college course in French conversation and composition, this course prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement examination of the College Board. The course stresses oral skills, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, and composition in French within the framework of French-speaking culture. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.

1 Credit/full year

French 5 (Independent Study, Senior)

This is an independent study course intended for students who have completed French 4 in their junior year. The focus of the course is on French history, literature, poetry, film and culture. There is a continued emphasis on developing proficiency in speaking, reading and writing French. Students meet regularly with the teacher to discuss reading and audio-visual assignments, develop proficiency in conversation and to reinforce advanced grammar. Students are expected to complete reading assignments and watch the relevant films during the summer break prior to the start of the course. Prerequisite: Final average of B in French 4, and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Italian 1 (Freshman)

This course introduces students to the communicative skills of understanding, speaking, reading, writing, and listening to standard Italian. Set mostly in Rome, Bologna, and Tuscany, the text focuses on daily life in Italy against the rich background of Italian history, as well as Italian cultural heritage, food, and popular culture.

1 Credit/full year

Italian 2 (Sophomore)

Italian 2 continues the development of Italian language proficiency begun in Italian 1. Students learn to speak, read, and write about themselves and about Italian life, history, and culture through text situations geared to high school students and through supplemental readings and film. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian 1 or equivalent.

1 Credit/full year

Italian 2 Honors (Sophomore)

Italian 2 continues the development of Italian language proficiency begun in Italian 1. Students learn to speak, read, and write about themselves and about Italian life, history, and culture through text situations geared to high school students and through supplemental readings and film. The pace is faster and the assessments more demanding than those in Italian 2. Prerequisite: Final average of a B+ or better in Italian 1 and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Italian 3 (Junior)

Both the quantity of required vocabulary and the complexity of language structures increase in the third level of Italian study. The students do speaking and writing activities which are designed to practice new language structures in authentic and practical ways. They read selections from the Ecco! Tre text and from other sources. They also examine Italian history and culture through film. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian 2 or equivalent.

1 Credit/full year

Italian 3 Honors (Junior)

Both the quantity of required vocabulary and the complexity of language structures increase in the third level of Italian study. The format for Italian 3 Honors resembles that of Italian 3, but the workload is more demanding, the pace, faster, and the standards, higher. Students do speaking activities that are designed to practice new languages structures in authentic and practical ways, write on complementary topics, and read selections from the Ecco 2 and Ecco 3 and I come Italia texts and a variety of other sources. Prerequisite: Final average of B+ or higher in Italian 2 Honors, and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Italian 4 (Senior)

This is a course for those who wish to continue their study of Italian and acquire additional skills in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Italian. Sources used include the college-level text, Oggi in Italia, other readings, and film. Prerequisite: Final average of C in Italian 3 and teacher recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Italian 4 Honors (Senior)

In order to provide as many students as possible with the opportunity to continue studying Italian at a more advanced level, we offer Italian 4 Honors to students who have met the requirements of B+ or higher in Italian 3 Honors or A in Italian 3. In recent years, registration numbers and staffing considerations have already precluded a separate AP Italian course. We hope to be able to offer an AP Italian course in the future. Students who wish to take the AP Italian exam are given extra help in their preparation to do so. Therefore, students may continue with Italian 4 Honors, a rigorous course, which stresses oral, reading, and writing skills, as well as Italian cultural heritage. The course is taught in Italian. Sources used include the college-level text Oggi in Italia, contemporary and classical literary selections, and film. Prerequisite: Final average of B+ or higher in Italian 3 Honors, and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Italian Language and Culture (Senior)

This course prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement examination of the College Board. The course stresses oral skills, writing skills, listening comprehension and reading comprehension in Italian. The course incorporates culture within the contemporary and historical contexts of Italian society. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Final average of B+ or higher in Italian 3 Honors, and teacher’s recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Latin 1 (Freshman)

This course offers the students a chance to study a language and culture that has heavily influenced the English language for more than 2000 years. The students will read Latin selections which slowly build their confidence and vocabulary until they are able to read and understand the Latin with a minimum of translation. Additional oral work is given in class to enhance the text, and students learn much about Roman culture and history from their reading. Vocabulary and graded grammar work is stressed and students come away from Latin 1 with a stronger command of English vocabulary through the study of derivatives from Latin.

1 Credit/full year

Latin 2 (Sophomore)

Latin 2 is an intermediate course which features a heavier emphasis on grammar and vocabulary. Latin 2 includes increased work in verb forms, including the perfect tense and the passive voice, and throughout the year a cultural emphasis is placed upon Greco/Roman mythology along with Roman history. Vocabulary continues to be an important component of the course, and students will work with forms that they’ll see again in Caesar and other Roman writers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 1.

1 Credit/full year

Latin 2 Honors (Sophomore)

Latin 2 Honors is an honors course which takes the material in the regular intermediate course and moves it along at a faster rate, and additionally covers the cultural material in the text for which a regular course cannot find time. Like Latin 2 it features a heavier emphasis on grammar and vocabulary, and includes increased work in verb forms, including the passive voice, and throughout the year an emphasis is placed upon the culture of the Romans along with their history. Vocabulary continues to be an important component of the course, and students will work with forms that they’ll see again in Caesar and other Roman writers. Prerequisite: A grade of B in Latin I and permission of the instructor.

1 Credit/full year

Latin 3 (Junior)

At the Latin language 3 level, students progress from tightly guided exercises to translating Roman authors. In this way independence and confidence in written communication, along with understanding written Latin, are gradually achieved. Students progress from the second level text to the third level, then through he prose of Livy, Caesar, Cicero, and then the poetry of Catullus, Horace, and Vergil. The students’ exploration of culture, music, art, literature, and history enlivens the Latin prose and poetry they read. Latin 3 helps prep the students for the AP Latin class. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin II and permission of the instructor.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Latin (Senior Elective)

Advanced Placement Latin is a college-level course that helps students develop their linguistic competence and analytical skills through various activities: precise, literal rendering of prepared poetry and prose; reading with comprehension of sight passages, both poetry and prose; and written analyses that reflect the results of critical reading in clear and coherent arguments supported by textual examples. The Latin texts that are read allow students to encounter some of the central people, events, and literary genres of Roman times, focusing on the core periods of the late Republic and the early Empire. Students will read from Vergil’s Aeneid, one of the most important works in Latin literature, and an excellent example of Latin poetic style, and from Caesar’s Gallic War, a fine example of Roman historiography and a discussion of ancient culture and ethnicity. English readings from Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar's Gallic War are also included in the required syllabus in order to put the Latin excerpts in a significant context. Using these authors and works as a base, the course helps students reach beyond translation to read with critical, historical and literary sensitivity. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

1 Credit/full year

Chinese 1 (Freshman)

This is an introductory course for motivated students who are open to a very different language-learning experience of a non-Romance language. The dialect taught is Mandarin as spoken in Beijing, which is accepted worldwide as the standard for Chinese. Students will develop the ability to engage in conversations on every-day topics with emphasis on proper grammar, pronunciation and colloquial expressions. There will be a gradual introduction to reading and writing the Chinese characters. Chinese customs and culture will be explored throughout the course. Prerequisite: For students who take this class as an elective in addition to another modern language course, they need a grade of C or better in the modern language class and teacher recommendation.

1 Credit/full year

Chinese 2 (Sophomore)

This course is a continuation of Course 491, Chinese 1. Students will continue the development of conversational skills with increasingly more difficult topics, more complex grammatical patterns, and expanded vocabulary. Increased emphasis will be placed on the reading and writing of Chinese characters. Chinese will be used in the conduct of the as much as possible. The integration of Chinese history, customs, and culture will continue to be integrated throughout the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese 1 and the recommendation of the teacher.

1 Credit/full year

Chinese 3 (Junior)

This is an intermediate level course, which builds on the skills developed in previous courses. Classes will be conducted entirely in Chinese to the extent possible. Increased emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills in addition to the continued development of oral skills needed to function in day-to-day real-life situations. Modern Chinese slang will be integrated into the expanding vocabulary. Chinese history and culture will continue to be a part of the overall learning experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese 2 and the recommendation of the teacher.

1 Credit/full year

Chinese 4 (Senior)

Chinese 4 completes the four-year curriculum in Chinese. This course uses collections of essays as the focus. Emphasis is on reading and discussions in Chinese on the readings. Periodic assessments test the students’ knowledge of an expanded vocabulary of characters as well as correct usage of language patterns. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese 3 and the recommendation of the teacher.

1 Credit/full year

World Language Faculty

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Lastenia Breen

Lastenia Breen
Faculty and Staff
World Languages Department

Michael Clemente

Michael Clemente
Class of 1989
Faculty and Staff, Alumni
World Languages Department

Nicholas Coggins

Nicholas Coggins
Faculty and Staff
World Languages Department, Academic Affairs Office

Benjamin Courtney

Benjamin Courtney
Class of 2007
Coaches, Faculty and Staff, Alumni
World Languages Department

Upon completion of a full science program, the La Salle student has the knowledge to critically observe and understand much of his world from an educated scientific point of view. By questioning, observing, interpreting, and communicating scientific information, the student approaches the outside world and its problems with the curiosity and openness needed to become a critical thinker.


Science Courses Offered

Integrated Science (Freshman)

This course gives freshmen an introduction to scientific study. The class will go into detail about the nature of science with an emphasis on hands-on application of the scientific method. Students will learn how to write professional lab reports. The course will also introduce students to keystone concepts of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. This course is structured to prepare students for the science requirement at La Salle College High School.

1 Credit/full year

Biology (Sophomores and Selected Freshmen)

This course provides the opportunity for students to study the biochemical basis of life, evolution, animal and plant morphology and systemics, using the scientific method as a mode of investigation. This course is designed to follow Integrated Science and uses an introduction to biochemistry to help explain the process of life.

1 Credit/full year

Biology Honors (Sophomores and Selected Freshmen)

This course provides an opportunity for students to study life with a detailed emphasis on the biochemical processes. (An introduction to Biochemistry is used to help explain the processes of life.) Using the scientific method, the students investigate evolution, animal and plant morphology and systemics. Student assessment is determined by tests, lab work and reports, homework, independent and group projects. The student is expected to express himself in detailed essay answers in order to show a higher level of concept recognition. Satisfactory performance demands a minimum daily allotment of 30 minutes study time. Prerequisite: Minimum 3.3 in Math; honors-level math strongly encouraged; A or A+ in Integrated Science; department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Chemistry (Sophomore / Junior)

This course is an introductory presentation of the fundamental concepts and experimental techniques of modern Chemistry. Using a hands-on application of the scientific method, the course material provides support for the principles on which Chemistry is based and substantiates the important interrelationship between experimentation and fact. When successfully mastered, the student will be able to validate, apply, and interpret the conceptual theory.

1 Credit/full year

Chemistry Honors (Sophomore / Junior)

This course follows the outline of topics for Chemistry 510. This is an HONORS course that emphasizes, at an accelerated pace, the mathematics of Chemistry, as well as the theory. In order to prepare the students for the Advanced Placement course, a more in-depth understanding of the topics are stressed. Student assessment is determined by tests, lab work and reports, homework and outside reading assignments. The student is expected to express himself in detailed essay answers, as well as traditional short answer responses. Satisfactory performance in the course demands a daily allotment of 30 minutes study time. Prerequisites: Minimum 3.3 average in both math and science courses, honors-level math is strongly encouraged; departmental approval.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Chemistry (Junior / Senior Elective)

The course is designed for students who, having mastered two semesters of Chemistry, desire to expand their knowledge of modern Chemistry. The Advanced Placement student is exposed to an in-depth study of chemical principles and their applications. The following topics will be integrated to allow the student to critically evaluate the chemistry of particular substances: atomic theory, bonding, thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, electrochemistry, acid-base theory, organic and nuclear chemistry. This course is equivalent to a first year college Chemistry course and is strongly recommended for prospective science majors and engineering and pre-medical students. Class will meet for the equivalent of four lecture periods and two double lab periods per cycle. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Minimum B in Chemistry Honors (511) and B in Honors Math or A- in Chemistry 510 and B+ in Math; honors-level math and science are strongly encouraged; department approval

1 Credit/full year

Physics (Junior / Senior)

This course is a non-calculus based Physics course that examines a variety of concepts in preparation for advanced Physics classes. This course is especially appropriate for students considering a college major in science or engineering, but is available to qualified students who wish to obtain a thorough understanding of basic Physics principles. It includes not only concept knowledge, but also stresses problem-solving using algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Students are evaluated by means of testing, laboratory reports, and homework assignments. Prerequisite: Minimum 2.0 average in Math courses; department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Physics 1 (Junior)

This course is for qualifying students who have not taken physics at La Salle. This course is a rigorous college-level physics course that is to prepare students for college work in engineering and the sciences. Topics covered are similar to those covered in the first semester of Physics but at a much deeper level. Additional topics include Mechanical Waves, Sound, Rotational Dynamics, Angular Momentum and Electrostatistics. The course is structured to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Physics I test. Junior students completing this course could then continue on their study of physics by taking AP Physics 2 (#521) or AP Physics C (#518). Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Minimum 3.5 average in both math and science courses; honors-level math and science are strongly encouraged; department approval

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Physics 2 (Senior)

AP Physics 2 is the next course in a sequence for students who successfully complete AP Physics 1. This course is a rigorous college-level physics course that isto prepare students for college work in engineering and the sciences. Topics covered are similar to those covered in the second semester of Physics but at a much deeper level. Additional topics include Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, electromagnetics, and Atomic and Nuclear physics. The course is structured to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Physics 2 test. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “B” AP Physics I and a minimum 3.5 average in math courses; honors-level math is strongly encouraged; department approval (limited enrollment)

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Physics C (Senior Elective)

This is a second year Physics course designed for students planning to take the Advanced Placement Physics C exam. It is particularly useful for future science/engineering majors. Most of the first semester is devoted to Mechanics, including several topics at a Calculus level. The second semester is devoted to Electricity and Magnetism, which relies heavily on Calculus. Problem solving is intensely stressed. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: A in Physics or B+ in AP Physics 1; student must have taken or be taking Calculus. Since the course is heavily math dependent, honors-level math is strongly encouraged; departmental approval.

1 Credit/full year

Anatomy and Physiology Honors (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course includes the study of the structure and functions of the human body, with special emphasis on the muscular, skeletal and nervous systems. Using a problem based approach, students investigate the regions of the body in a holistic rather than in a systemic manner. Dissection model is the cat. Tests, class participation and presentations are used to evaluate the student. Prerequisite: B or higher in Science classes taken; department approval (limited enrollment)

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Biology (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is patterned after the suggested curriculum for Advanced Placement Biology. Student evaluation is based on tests, independent readings, and lab performance. The course represents two introductory college level biology courses with an emphasis on the following topic areas: the process of evolution which drives the diversity and unity of life; biological systems which utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis; living systems which store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes; and biological systems which interact and their interactions possess complex properties. 42 Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Minimum 3.5 average in biology and chemistry courses; honors-level science is strongly encouraged; departmental approval.

1 Credit/full year

Environmental Science (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is designed for students who desire an elective that explores scientific principles in depth and applies course concepts to field investigations and lab activities. The focus of the course is on ecology and it will investigate the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships that exist in the natural world. By studying scientific foundations of geology, hydrology, meteorology, and ecology, students will understand the many facets of environmental science, including the dangers of air and water pollution, nuclear energy, and the fragile nature of the biosphere. Note: Students expecting to have a successful experience in this course are recommended to have a C average in science; department approval may be necessary.

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Placement Environmental Science (Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college course in Environmental Science. The class gives qualified and interested students an introduction to the ecological principles of Environmental Science through the use of a lab program, field trips, and independent research, in addition to traditional teaching and learning techniques. By taking an interdisciplinary approach, studying scientific foundations of geology, hydrology, meteorology, and ecology, as well as concepts from economics, politics, and sociology, students will understand the many facets of Environmental Science. The course also focuses on the benefits and rewards of our technology as well as the dangers of air, water, and soil pollution, nuclear energy, and the fragile nature of the biosphere. Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May. Prerequisite: Minimum B in all Science and Math courses; department approval.

1 Credit/full year

Bioethics (Senior Elective)

Throughout the span of the year, students will cover a wide array of topics in medicine, healthcare systems, and research through a perspective of understanding the scientific principles behind each topic and looking at the ethical implications of each decision. The course will work through the major ideas of Aristotle, Socrates, Plato, Hume, Locke, Kant, Mill, and other contemporary philosophers. Through this deeper understanding and application of ideas such as utilitarianism and Aristotle’s virtuous life, students will explore topics/issues that currently face medicine, research, and our healthcare system. Students will be expected to use their critical thinking and writing skills they attained from previous science, English, and religion courses. Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA, department approval.

.5 Credit

Zoology (Junior / Senior Elective)

Zoology is the study of all things dealing with animals. This course will include the recognition and classification of animals their anatomy, physiology, development, histology, ecology, behavior and 43 evolution. This course will focus on how body plans have changed over time resulting in the diversity of animals. An understanding of form and function allows students to study how animals have evolved over time and relate animals to their particular role in the ecosystem. Students will also be able to develop an understanding of how all organisms are interconnected. Students should come to realize that humans can positively and negatively impact animal populations and diversity. Prerequisite: Completion of Biology, department approval, limited enrollment.

.5 Credit

Science Faculty

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Thomas Barna

Thomas Barna
Faculty and Staff
Science Department, Academic Affairs Office

Jeremy Butt

Jeremy Butt
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Science Department, Athletics Office

Daniel Cipolla

Daniel Cipolla
Parents, Faculty and Staff
Science Department

Charles Cirelli

Charles Cirelli
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Science Department, Dean of Students Office

Information Science and Technology prepares students to bridge the gap that often exists in the workplace between the providers of information technology and the end users of the technology. After the required Information Literacy course freshman year, a student can explore electives in the four sub-areas of the discipline of Information Sciences and Technology: Programming, Digital Design, Multimedia Production, and Microsoft IT Training Academy.

The department prides itself on using cutting edge technology, experiential learning, offers professional-level certifications and industry standard software for all courses in the department.

For more information on our Office of Information Technology, visit www.lschs.org/Technology.


Information Sciences and Technology Courses Offered

Information Literacy (Freshman Required)

The overall goal of this revamped course is to develop familiarity with digital and media resources available to the students, to increase competence in foundational computer skills, and promote awareness of ethical use of technology. The course begins with an introduction to digital and academic resources at La Salle College High School and an exploration of the ethics and responsibility of using digital and social media. Next, this course aims to integrate in-depth instruction and specific lessons on Microsoft’s Office 2013 Suite – Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote. This course will incorporate an interdisciplinary approach that will prompt students to make practical and relevant applications of their skills in Microsoft Office in assignments and assessments in other courses.

.5 Credit/full year, 2/6 days

Visual Basic Programming (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This course uses Visual Basic 2012, an object-oriented/event-driven language, to teach programming concepts. The student will learn Visual Basic 2008 tools to design Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) applications for the Personal Computer, PDA, Smart Phone, and Web Services. Students also learn how to create data-enabled and powerful client/server applications by using LINQ (Language Integrated Query) which adds data querying capabilities for SQL Server, XML, and objects to Visual Basic.
Prerequisite: B in Math.

.5 Credit/semester

JAVA Programming (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

JAVA Programming is an introductory course in computer programming, using the JAVA programming language. JAVA is the official language for A.P. Computer Science. This course covers the fundamentals of programming in the JAVA programming, including variables, data types, operators, and control flow, as well as some of the special features of JAVA: Object Oriented Programming including classes and inheritance.
Prerequisite: Minimum B+ in a regular Math course or a B in an advanced Math course.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Placement Computer Science (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

The course prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement Test in Computer Science in May. The official language is JAVA. Topics include: Programming Style, Run-Time Behavior, Structured Coding, Modular Design, Linear Data Structures, Linked Lists and Trees, Files, Debugging, Sorting Methods, etc. It is meant to be the equivalent to a first-year college-level Computer Science course.
Note: As with all Advanced Placement courses at La Salle, students are expected to take the A.P. exam in May.
Prerequisite: Good Math grades and permission from the instructor.

1 Credit/full year

Digital Images with Adobe Photoshop (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in the first semester annually)
This course is the pre-requisite to the rest of the Multimedia, Print, and Web Design tracks at La Salle. A full eText of the latest version of “Adobe Photoshop Classroom in a Book” is available to students along with online training modules and project files through Pearson. Students will be prepared to take an Adobe Certification Exam upon completion of this course. Specific course topics include: basics of project management for visual communication; fundamentals of image composition; design elements and terminology; preparation of images for Web, print, and video production; the Adobe Photoshop interface; and how to create and manipulate images using Adobe Photoshop tools.

.5 Credit/semester

Computer Aided Design (C.A.D.) (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is an introduction to the process of Computer Aided Design (CAD) using the design software AutoCAD, the most widely used computer aided drafting program in the architecture and engineering industries. Students will learn the fundamental skills necessary to create and print basic two-dimensional (2D) drawings. Students will also be introduced to three-dimensional (3D) modeling using SketchUP and AutoCAD 3D. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be prepared for college courses using CAD and have the ability to pursue an Autodesk certification in AutoCAD. Class size will be restricted due to the design of the course. Upper classmen will receive preference.

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Computer Aided Design (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This course expands on the knowledge previously learned in the introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD) class. Students will be using AutoCAD and SketchUP to create detailed technical drawings and complex 3D models. Upon successful completion of the course students will gain a deeper knowledge of the CAD process, improve their AutoCAD proficiency and be prepared to take the Autodesk Certification in AutoCAD.
Prerequisite: Computer Aided Design

.5 Credit/semester

Web Design with Adobe Dreamweaver (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in the second semester annually)
This course will build upon the digital design fundamentals taught in the pre-requisite “Digital Images with Photoshop” course. This course will specifically focus on the basics of Web Design from HTML and CSS to WYSIWYG Editors such as Adobe Dreamweaver. A full eText of the latest version of “Adobe Dreamweaver Classroom in a Book” is available to students along with online training modules and project files through Pearson. Students will be prepared to take an Adobe Certification Exam upon completion of this course. Specific course topics include: basics of project management for Websites; fundamentals of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS); Web design elements and terminology; preparation of images for the Web; embedding rich media content on the Web; understanding the Adobe Dreamweaver interface; how to create and publish Websites using Adobe Dreamweaver.
Prerequisite: Digital Images with Adobe Photoshop

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Web Design with Adobe Dreamweaver (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Tentatively scheduled to be offered in 2016-17)

.5 Credit/semester

Web Site Management (Independent Study, Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This independent study allows students to work side-by-side with our Director of Web Communications to update and manage content for the La Salle College High School Web site. Independent projects will be developed based on each student’s strengths in content management, graphic design, and/or Web based programming

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Web Design and approval from Director of Web Communications.

1 Credit/full year

Print Design with Adobe InDesign (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in the second semester annually)
This course will build upon the digital design fundamentals taught in the pre-requisite “Digital Images with Photoshop” course. This course will specifically focus on the basics of print design and publication. A full eText of the latest version of “Adobe InDesign Classroom in a Book” is available to students along with online training modules through Pearson. Students will be prepared to take an Adobe Certification Exam upon completion of this course. Specific course topics include: basics of project management for print publications; fundamentals of design for print media; print design elements and terminology; preparation of images for print publications; understanding the Adobe InDesign interface; how to create and publish print publications using Adobe InDesign.
Prerequisite: Digital Images with Adobe Photoshop

.5 Credit/semester

Multimedia Production with Adobe Premiere (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in the second semester annually)
This course will build upon the digital design fundamentals taught in the pre-requisite “Digital Images with Photoshop” course. This course will specifically focus on the basics of multimedia design and production. A full eText of the latest version of “Adobe Premiere Classroom in a Book” is available to students along with online training modules through Pearson. Students will be prepared to take an Adobe Certification Exam upon completion of this course. Specific course topics include: basics of project management for multimedia production; fundamentals of video composition; video production elements and terminology; preparation of video files for TV and Web; and understanding the Adobe Premiere interface and production process.
Prerequisite: Digital Images with Adobe Photoshop

.5 Credit/semester

Advanced Print Design with Adobe InDesign (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Tentatively scheduled to be offered in 2016-17)

.5 Credit/semester

Print Design Management (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Tentatively scheduled to be offered in 2016-17)

1 Credit/full year

Advanced Multimedia Production (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is designed to build upon the first Multimedia course and introduce the student to advanced multimedia production techniques. Students will be trained as news producers/reporters and will be expected to create video content for WEXP and the La Salle Web site weekly. Assignments will be given and each student is responsible to complete them in a specific time period. Students will be required to produce content outside of the scheduled class time as necessary.
Prerequisite: Multimedia Production

1 Credit/full year

Multimedia Management (Independent Study, Junior / Senior Elective)

This independent study allows students to work side-by-side with our Director of Multimedia Technology to produce and manage digital content for WEXP and the La Salle Web site. This hands-on experience will allow students to assist in the daily management of a student-run TV station and gain valuable realworld experience in the constantly changing field of multimedia technology.
Prerequisite: Advanced Multimedia Production or approval from Director of Multimedia Technology.

1 Credit/full year

Network Management (Senior Elective)

This independent study allows students to work side-by-side with our Chief Information Officer in performing the daily maintenance on the La Salle Academic Network. The hands-on experience provides students the skills needed to run a 1200-user network.
Prerequisite: Students need to have at least two Official Microsoft Certifications and approval by the instructor.

1 Credit/full year

Administering Windows Server (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in first semester of 2015-16)
(Corresponding Microsoft Certification Exam: 70-411, Administering Windows Server 2012) This course is intended for Information Technology (IT) Professionals with hands-on experience working in a Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2012 environment, who want to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to manage and maintain the core infrastructure required for a Windows Server 2012 environment. The key focus for students in this course is to broaden the initial deployment of Windows Server 2012 services and infrastructure and provide the skills necessary to manage and maintain a domain based Windows Server 2012 environment, such as user and group management, network access and data security.

.5 Credit/semester

Configuring Advanced Windows Server Services (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in second semester of 2015-16)
(Corresponding Microsoft Certification Exam: 70-412, Configuring Advanced Windows Server 2012 Services) This class provides the skills and knowledge necessary to implement a core Windows Server 2012 infrastructure in an existing enterprise environment. It covers implementing, managing, maintaining, and provisioning services and infrastructure in a Windows Server 2012 environment. Students will learn advanced configuration and service tasks for deploying, managing, and maintaining a Windows Server 2012 infrastructure. This includes identity management, network load balancing, business continuity, disaster recovery, fault tolerance, and rights management.

.5 Credit/semester

Installing and Configuring Windows Server (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in the first semester of 2016-17)
This course is intended for Students Interested in gaining a valuable industry-recognized certification. It is for students who have good knowledge of the Windows operating system and want to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to implement the core infrastructure services in an existing Windows Server 2012 environment. Although students would benefit from having some previous Windows Server experience, they must have good hands-on Windows Client experience with Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Windows 8. After completing this course, students will be able to: install and configure Windows Server 2012; describe Active Directory Domain Services and install a domain controller; create and configure user, group, and computer objects; use Windows PowerShell and other command-line tools to create and configure AD DS objects; configure IPv4 for simple scenarios; install and configure a DHCP server; install and configure DNS service; configure IPv6 for simple scenarios; configure local storage on a server; create and secure files shares and shared printers; create and manage Group Policy objects; secure Windows Servers by Using Group Policy Objects; and implement Server Virtualization with HyperV.

.5 Credit/semester, meets 3/6 days

Designing and Implementing Server Infrastructure (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

(Offered in the second semester of 2016-17)
(Corresponding Microsoft Certification Exam 70-413) This course is the most advanced Microsoft offering that is given at any Microsoft IT Academy or Microsoft Authorized training center. It will cover critical advanced Server Skills including: Server Deployment, Monitoring and Maintaining Servers, performance/security evaluation and optimization, as well as planning for continuity and high availability. The final portion of the class would be aimed towards creating a fully documented network deployment and disaster recovery plan.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of course Windows Server Administration Fundamentals (98365) and at least two other IT Academy electives, which include IT Academy summer courses

.5 Credit/semester, meets 3/6 days

Information Sciences and Technology Faculty

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Robert Johnson

Robert Johnson
Faculty and Staff
Information Sciences & Technology Department, Office of Information Technology

Vishal Patel

Vishal Patel
Faculty and Staff
Science Department, Information Sciences & Technology Department

Patrick Rose

Patrick Rose
Class of 1999
Faculty and Staff, Alumni
Information Sciences & Technology Department

Michael Sabatino

Michael Sabatino
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
English Department, Information Sciences & Technology Department, Office of Information Technology

The Physical Education program at La Salle is made up of a semester of organized activities in gym and/or outdoor athletic facilities, and a semester of aquatics and water safety activities in the pool during two of a student’s four years at the school. Physical education at La Salle High School is intended to be a program that will provide the student with a means for proper physical, mental, emotional, and social development, and contribute to the healthy enjoyment of his life after high school. The program tries to take into account the needs of both the individual and the group, and as such, it permits each student to progress at his own level of ability.

The Health course is designed to help students indentify the physical, psychological, social, hereditary, and environmental factors that affect health. Wit this knowledge the student should be able to develop a plan for maintaining good overall health. Specific topics covered include: physical and mental health, nutrition, drug and alcohol abuse, and sexually transmitted disases.


Physical Education & Health Faculty

Physical Fitness (Sophomore / Junior / Senior)

The Physical Fitness course focuses on cardiovascular and weight training in the La Salle fitness center. It counts toward satisfaction of the physical education requirement. A grade of pass or fail is earned.

.5 Credit/semester

Physical Education / Aquatics 1 (Freshman)

These courses provide students with the proper techniques for physical development. These courses take into account the needs of both the individual and the group, and as such, permit each student to progress to his own level of ability. Students take one semester of gym and one semester of aquatics.

.5 Credit/full year

Physical Education 2 (Sophomore)

This course is scheduled as a reminder to students who have yet to fulfill their physical education requirement. Aside from taking a scheduled class, such as Physical Fitness or Principles of Athletic Training, credit for upperclassmen can be earned by: a) participating in an interscholastic sport at either the varsity or junior varsity level; or b) participating in at least two intramural sports over the course of the academic school year.

.5 Credit/full year

Physical Education 2 (Junior)

This course is scheduled as a reminder to students who have yet to fulfill their physical education requirement. Aside from taking a scheduled class, such as Physical Fitness or Principles of Athletic Training, credit for upperclassmen can be earned by: a) participating in an interscholastic sport at either the varsity or junior varsity level; or b) participating in at least two intramural sports over the course of the academic school year.

.5 Credit/full year

Physical Education 2 (Senior)

This course is scheduled as a reminder to students who have yet to fulfill their physical education requirement. Aside from taking a scheduled class, such as Physical Fitness or Principles of Athletic Training, credit for upperclassmen can be earned by: a) participating in an interscholastic sport at either the varsity or junior varsity level; or b) participating in at least two intramural sports over the course of the academic school year.

.5 Credit/full year

Health (Freshman)

This course is an overview of the broad field of health. It is designed to help the student identify the physical, psychological, social, hereditary, and environmental factors that affect his health. With this knowledge, the student should be able to develop a plan for maintaining good overall health. Specific topics to be covered include: physical and mental health, nutrition, drug and alcohol abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases.

.5 Credit/semester

Principles of Athletic Training (Sophomore / Junior / Senior Elective)

This course is offered to those who have had an introduction to athletic training through personal experience or who have approval. The student will be exposed to the basics in prevention, identification and treatment of athletic related injuries. Hands-on experience will be the major source for evaluation. Each student will be required to give 10 hours a week after school in the trainer’s room and on the playing field. The course will also explore current techniques used in a variety of competitive sports and exercises. Practical work and written examinations will be used for evaluation. Sophomores and Juniors can use this course as a substitute for Physical Education.

.5 Credit/semester

Physical Education & Health Faculty

Janice Ciccimaro

Janice Ciccimaro
Faculty and Staff
Health Services, Phys.Ed. & Health Department

Frank Lichtner

Frank Lichtner
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Phys.Ed. & Health Department

Walter Muehlbronner

Walter  Muehlbronner
Coaches, Faculty and Staff
Admissions Office, Phys.Ed. & Health Department
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